Happy Book Birthday to The Big Book of Submission, Volume 2

The Big Book of Submission, Volume 2 is available now in ebook, with print and audiobook editions to follow. If handsome professors, sex toys, and stubborn submissives are your thing, you’ll want to check out my very sexy erotic short “Continuing Education,” inspired by countless fantasies dreamed up in regrettably less titillating lecture halls of yore.

Really, it’s a wonder I made it through college.

“Panic set in…

Izumi could feel her clit pulsing in anticipation of the orgasm that now dangled out of reach. Perhaps if she were able to rock her hips, but not with all these people here, their knees and shoulders and stale coffee breath pressing in on her.

Miles flashed Izumi a knowing grin. “I hope you were taking notes.”

Read this story and many more in The Big Book of Submission, Vol 2 from Cleis Press!

Whether you’re simply curious about submission or regularly revel in the delights of BDSM, these 69 erotic short stories about submissives will turn you on.

From participating in a musical recital that takes a very kinky turn to making a grocery run while using sex toys to indulging in a risqué office encounter during working hours, these subs delight in obeying (or deliberately disobeying) their masters and mistresses in public and in private. They’re rewarded and punished the most wicked of ways that will leave you breathless. Edited by Rachel Kramer Bussel, with stories by Selena Kitt, Jade A. Waters, Dorothy Freed, and Sommer Marsden, among other talented writers, The Big Book of Submission, Volume 2 offers arousing tales that delve deep into the thrills of spanking, bondage, power dynamics, service, exhibitionism, erotic adventure, and much more.

Available in ebook from these retailers:

Amazon Kindle U.S. | Nook | Google Play | iBooks | Kobo | Amazon Canada Kindle | Amazon UK Kindle

Pre-order the print edition, coming January 9th:

Amazon U.S. | Barnes and Noble | IndieBound | Amazon Canada | Amazon UK
♥ Audiobook edition coming soon ♥

“House Rules” Now Available!

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I am pleased to announce that my short, kinky story “House Rules” is now available as part of Insatiable Press’s first original anthology exploring women’s secret fantasies, Surprising Myself.

Read an excerpt!

Cole’s gaze narrowed. “So, Maddy, tell me what you’re into.”

It wasn’t a question.

“Standard stuff, I guess,” I said. “Bondage, S&M, submission. Spanking.”

His lip quirked. “You want to be spanked.”

My buzz was wearing off. I wiped the sweat from my upper lip, hoping he hadn’t noticed it, which was silly because we were practically on top of each other. I was tired of talking and having the spotlight focused solely on me. “What about you? I’m sure the sex you and your fiancé had put everything you did with Ashley to shame.”

“My ex wasn’t into it.”

“Oh.” I paused. “How long were you two together?”

Cole’s gaze dropped. “A year and a half.”

“Can I ask what happened?” I needed to hear him say it.

Cole sighed. “I scened with someone else. We didn’t have sex, but we may as well have, as far as my ex was concerned. She was right, in a lot of ways. There was some emotional infidelity.” He studied his hands. “It’d been so long. I just…needed the release. I never wanted to hurt her.” He grunted. “I mean, I did. That was kind of the problem.”

Cole scrubbed his guilt-ridden face. I couldn’t condone his behavior, but I could relate. For years I’d placed myself in relationships with men who couldn’t give me what I wanted. I thought I was being practical, but in truth, I was afraid — afraid that the things I wanted were too extreme, too strange, too hard to find, so why bother?

Eventually, I stopped dating altogether. Vanilla sex left me hollow. I wanted to be filled to bursting.

I took a deep breath and touched Cole’s knee. “I’m sorry. I know how it feels to repress who you are in order to fit someone else’s mold of what’s acceptable, and I know what it is to deny yourself the things you want most. But you shouldn’t have to.”

Cole stared at my hand. “Why do you deny yourself?”

“Fear mostly. And the belief that what I want most is something I can never have.”

“And what do you want?” Cole studied me, his eyes hungry for something I couldn’t put into words. I only knew I wanted to give it to him.

“Release.”

He wetted his lips. “Madeline, when you played with your exes, did you use a safe word?”

“Yes.”

“What was it?”

I swallowed hard.

“Mercy.”

Product Description: Thirteen writers present sexy, steamy stories of women getting the chance to live out their personal fantasies. What’s yours? Whether it’s several lovers at the same time for a pulse-pounding ménage scene or the allure of getting caught in public, these stories will set your mind ablaze. From voyeurism in a sex club to swinging, cuckolding to cosplay, Surprising Myself brings you stories from 13 hot new writers to watch out for and just might make you think about fulfilling your own wildest fantasy.

Surprising Myself (ed. by Matthew Cooper) is available in ebook and audiobook formats from Amazon, Amazon UK, Barnes & Noble and Audible.

Erotic Poem: “These Things”

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It’s been a while since I’ve posted, but this little nugget popped into my free write this morning, so I thought I’d share.


He’s the guy who works for your dad, at the auto repair shop, who wouldn’t turn you down if you hit on him when you were sixteen.

Fifteen, he might raise an eyebrow. Depends on how many beers he’s had. He’d offer you one. Maybe a cigarette, too.

He’d make fun of you a little, quirk his lip around the bottle, and stare openly at your breasts. If you kissed him, he’d kiss you back, but not first. Never first.

Sometimes, these things just happen.

He might finger you, but he wouldn’t go down. Not this time.

At least he’d let you look into his eyes while he fucked you. And he wouldn’t ask “Was that your first time?” until after he’d already come.

On Finishing: What I’ve Learned from Completing a First Draft

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Rounding out at approximately 87,000 words, my novel-in-progress is no longer in-progress. It is done. Well, what I call the “first working draft” of it, anyway. It’s not quite a first draft since I’ve been editing and posting it on Literotica chapter-by-chapter since April 2014, but it’s still a bit rough around the edges—especially those first few chapters. While my ultimate plans for the story are still up in the air, I can say that I’m really, really glad to have finally laid down that last sentence. It took ten months to complete this story and with three anthology projects lined up for February, I’m going to need all the extra headspace I can scrounge up.

I don’t want to wax poetic about the process because, as a rule, I try not to treat my words as though they were precious. Yes, I live and breathe writing and storytelling, but if there’s one quality that I could giftwrap and ship to every budding writer, it would be ruthlessness. By that, I mean: don’t coddle yourself or your work, pledge to finish what you start (and then do that), and if cutting an 8k draft down to 500 words will make the story better, then by all means, snip away.

Having said that, I will concede that the post-I-just-wrote-a-book-high is pretty fantastic in a quiet, “Well, how ‘bout that?” sort of way. I tried really hard not to harbor any expectations as to how it would feel, but a few managed to slip in somewhere between the final chapter and the epilogue. I expected to cry a lot and maybe wind up on the floor for a while. That didn’t happen. In fact, more than anything, what I really want to do is get back to work: the consistent, comforting routine of sitting quietly and meeting the quota.

Don’t get me wrong, I love this story. I love the characters and the smutty romance and the weird little connections that weren’t intended but somehow found themselves lining up all pretty and semi-coherent on the page. I’m happy to have finally given my characters, and hopefully, my readers, a sense of closure and an ending that doesn’t leave them smacking their tongues like they’ve just tasted something cloying.

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Finishing this story has taught me a lot about both myself as a writer and novel-crafting in general. My hope is that these observations might be of some use to you, especially if you’re in the thick of your first big project. So, without further ado, here are five things I’ve learned from completing a first draft:

1. Writing fiction will make you more honest and compassionate. While our stories and characters may be imaginary, what we’re ultimately attempting to accomplish each time we put our words to paper is the tapping of some universal truth, something each of us can relate to. Striving to create authentic characters forces us to look at people—really look at them—and see them as they truly are, prejudices and all. It cultivates compassion. I once heard it argued that the best actors are those who, rather than judge a character’s actions or motivations, pause and take the time to contemplate, “How might I be different if I were subject to these particular circumstances?” Writing requires a similar suspension of cognizance. We pull people out of our brain-muck and then make them do things and sometimes those things aren’t so nice. It’s important that we understand why they do the things they do, not just so that we can make them believable, but so that we can make them sympathetic.

2. Trust the stream-of-consciousness. This one took a while to embrace because, for a long time, I was an “edit as I go” kind of writer. However, while that might work for some, I find it to be crippling. You know that incredible feeling when the words just flow as though the prose was moving through you from some other-worldly source? Well, there’s no better way to quell that stream than to ask it to hold on a second while you perfect this description of a chandelier. It’s tough to look at a line of dialogue and know that it’s crap and leave it there anyway, but that’s the pain and pleasure of revision: don’t worry, you’ll be back…many times over. Just get the words down.

3. The show vs. tell situation is slightly different for Erotica and Romance writers. I wish someone had told me this sooner. Somewhere around chapters four and five of The Cabin, I started to feel like I was writing a technical manual. I was reading a lot of craft books that advised me to show, show, show instead of tell. However, what I didn’t realize at the time was that telling is actually an important tool for Romance writers, especially when writing in first-person. Love and sexuality are incredibly personal subjects. If the characters aren’t baring themselves both physically and emotionally, they can come off as cold, stiff, and unrelatable—the kiss of death for a Romance novelist. No, you don’t want to drown your readers in exposition and if I can convey attraction with a shy smile and a head-tilt rather than flat-out stating, “I think you’re dreamy,” I will. But Romance readers expect that inner monologue, and for good reason. It’s a staple of the genre that places the reader inside the protagonist’s head and then guides them throughout the rest of the story, helping them understand why the character might feel or react a certain way. Speaking of which…

4. If the characters are resisting, something might be wrong. I’m not talking about dragging them kicking and screaming into necessary hardships. I’m talking about recognizing a dead end when you see one. For a while I tried really, really hard to convince two of my characters to get friendly, but they wouldn’t have it. That I even needed to “convince” them was a red flag that I wasn’t being faithful to their motivations. Coming up with a great scene is only half the battle. Ensuring that all the pieces align to make said event happen the way you want requires forethought. You need to sow those seeds early so that each action a character takes makes sense.

5. You won’t know how good (or not good) it is until you get some distance. Now, this is another area where a lot of writers differ, but I happen to identify with the camp that needs to tuck a finished piece away for a while before they can effectively edit it. How long this period lasts depends on length. Short stories need maybe a few days to a week, while a novel would require significantly more time to breathe—at least a month. I like to use that in-between time to refresh my brain with shorter projects, like anthology submissions. Each new venture has the potential to stretch you that much further, improving your voice and strengthening your storytelling muscles. By the time you pull that old project out of the digital drawer, you’ll be looking at it with a brand new set of eyes.

Bonus: It really is all about finishing. There are few good reasons not to finish and sucking isn’t one of them. All first drafts suck. We hear it time and time again: “You can always edit a bad page. You can’t edit a blank page” (Jodi Picoult). Granted, knowing when to abandon a project is a skill unto itself, but I’d venture to say that you’re better off at least finishing a first draft before making that call. Finishing is about more than just ending a story. It’s about resolve and proving to yourself (and others, but that’s less important) that you are capable of doing what you set out to do. If you can do it once, you can do it again. And again. And again.

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Guest Poem: “Heels and Scratch” by MrFoxwood

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Happy Friday!

This past week has been chock full of writing and revisions, both for my WIP and my short story submission to Frisky Feminist Press’s Coffee Romance anthology. Unfortunately, that means I haven’t had much time to work on other things (like blogging).

Fortunately, I have a madly talented writer friend who is willing to donate his well-crafted verse in my stead!

MrFoxwood, or Will, as I’ve come to know him, is an erotic poetry and fiction writer with whom I’ve had the immense pleasure of corresponding and workshopping. His work is vivid, lyrical, and oh-so-stimulating. I encourage you to check out his primary blog, 13th step study, where he posts poetry and other literary musings; his secondary blog, not so secret stash, where you can find a sampling of his original artwork and photography, plus other titillating visuals (often NSFW); and his Literotica profile, where you can read some of his short erotic fiction (FYI, some of the banner ads are NSFW).

This poem is one of my favorites.

Heels and Scratch

Heels on marble floor,
all prim and purpose,
prick my ears,
raise my head from the paper,
you’re immaculate,
you’d lick your hand to remove a stray seed from your shirt.

I don’t want to hear you purr,
I want to lose your control,
I want cat-scratch and scream.

I want one heel lost,
and a hell of a lot more than one stray seed on your shirt,
I want fingers fumbling fastenings,
and digits duelling underthings,
and under things.

I want perfume that intoxicates,
stubble on your throat,
scotch exhaled over your ear,
and hands pinned.

I want dog chase cat around your hotel room,
I want you to give as good as you get,
bite for bite,
scratch for scratch.

Flash Fiction: Order Up

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I’m a big fan of free writes. When sitting down to work on a project, I like to start out with a fifteen minute free write. Anything and everything is acceptable, no matter how petty or trite. Skipping this process tends to result in fewer words written overall and a tendency to become distracted. Most of the time, what comes out is self-serving drivel: my plans for the day, a great meal I’ve recently cooked and/or eaten, a rant about well-meaning family members who just don’t “get it”. Sometimes I surprise myself by coming up with something coherent— and maybe even cohesive.

What follows is the result of my most recent free write. It’s clearly the beginning of something, though I’m still a bit fuzzy on exactly what. Mostly, I’m sharing it to prove that you can plant your butt at the page with every intention of kvetching about noisy neighbors and the ever-growing pile of dishes and still walk away with something that makes you think, “Hey, not bad.”

If you like what you read here, I encourage you to share your thoughts in the comments.


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“What can I get for you?”

My ears pricked at the deep, Southern drawl.

“I’ll have a burger, medium, no fries.”

“Something to drink with that, sir?”

“Large coke.”

“And for you, ma’am?”

Yeah, it was him all right. I knew his family owned the place, but, I had no idea he’d still be around four years later. My chest tightened, among other things.

“I’ll have the meatloaf with a side of gravy.”

“And to drink?”

“A diet coke.”

“Great, I’ll have those cokes out for you in a few moments.”

“Thanks.”

I shielded my face with the menu as he stalked past the booth. His stride was just as I remembered: long and heavy, yet agile. He even smelled the same.

Shit.

The restroom door creaked and out marched Sarah, wiping her hands on her jeans.

“No paper towels. Fucking hick town.” She slid into the booth. “You okay, Callie?”

I peered over the laminate. “Yeah, fine.”

She opened her menu. “What’s good in this dive?”

“I don’t know. It’s all pretty much classic diner food.”

“Come on, you used to work here back in high school, right? Help me avoid food poisoning.”

“That was years ago. Things change.”

“Nothing changes. Just loses its shine, that’s all.”

“Hmm.” I glared at the Early Bird Special.

“Hot waiter, though.” She snickered.

“Where?”

“Over by the counter. I prefer ‘em clean shaven, as you know, but he’s perfect for you.”

“Right.”

“Aren’t you gonna look?”

“Nope.”

“Sheesh. What crawled up your butt?”

I scowled. “Nothing. I’m fine.”

“Well, either way, you’re in luck.”

“Why’s that?”

“Because he’s coming over here.”

“Fuck,” I spat.

His footsteps thudded on the old oak floors. I angled towards the interior of the booth.

“What’s wrong with you?” Sarah whispered.

“Have you ladies had enough time to look at the men—Callie?”

My heart sprang into my throat. The leather groaned beneath me as I rotated. “Hey, Josh.”

Dear, God, that lopsided grin.

Continue reading “Flash Fiction: Order Up”